Castle Ward - East Division

Earsdon Parish

  EARSDON, a parish comprising the townships of Backworth, Blyth and Newsham, Burradon, Earsdon, Hartley, Holywell, Seaton Delaval, and Sighill, is bounded on the north by Bedlingtonshire, on the west by Long Benton, Cramlington, and Horton, on the south by Tynemouth, and on the east by the German Ocean. It is a rich and fertile district abounding with excellent stone and coal, of which great quantities are annually exported from Blyth and Hartley. The surface of the parish consists of gentle undulations, and is well suited for various kinds of agricultural produce. It is about seven and a half miles in length by six in breadth, and comprises an area of 11,646 acres, The population in 1801, was 3,651; in 1811, 4,388; in 1821, 4,644; in 1831, 6,460; in 1841, 9,429; and in 1851, it had increased to 10,982 souls.

BLYTH (SOUTH) is a chapelry, township, and seaport, in Earsdon parish, situated on the southern bank of the river Blyth at its junction with the German Ocean, nine miles south-east of Morpeth, and thirteen miles north-east of Newcastle. Blyth and Newsham lordship from one township whose area is 1,180 acres; and its population in 1801, was 1,170; in 1811, 1,522; in 1821, 1,805; in 1831, 1,769; in 1841, 1,921; and in 1851, it had increased to 2,584, souls. The principal landowner is Sir Matthew White, Ridley, Bart. Steam coal of excellent quality is raised in this neighbourhood, three of the principal mines being calculated to produce from 1,700 to 2,000 tons per diem, and affording, with the other collieries of the district, abundant employment for shipping. From the neighbourhood of Gloucester Lodge, and Link Houses, beautiful views of the beach, Bath-row, and Camboise water, may be obtained. Warm, cold, and shower baths have been recently established at Bath Bow, and Crofton Mills, and families can be comfortably accommodated at the various inns in the neighbourhood.

Blyth, like many other places, has risen rapidly, and is mainly indebted for its present prosperous condition, to the energetic and industrious character of its inhabitants. A considerable portion of the town has extended into the adjoining township of Cowpen - and Cowpen Square, Cowpen Quay, Crofton, Crofton Mills, and Waterloo, now form part of the town and port of Blyth. Formerly the streets were small and irregular, and the general arrangement of the buildings inconvenient, but now the town contains several spacious streets, and the aspect of the different buildings is much improved. The houses are chiefly constructed of brick and are generally two stories high. Water works have been recently constructed in the lordship of Newsham, by Sir M.W. Ridley, Bart., and there is no doubt that the cleanliness and sanitary condition of the place will thereby be much improved. House property continues to increase, and ample accommodation for visitors is now to be met with. Gas works have been erected by a joint-stock company, who have a large gasometer in a central situation between Blyth and Cowpen Quay, and the lighting of the town with gas has much improved its general appearance. The harbour of Blyth, situated within a short distance of the German Ocean is very safe, and there are few instances upon record of vessels suffering damage upon entering it, even in the most tempestuous weather. It has a south-easterly outlet, and with the wind in any point from N.N.E., to W.S.W., can be entered by vessels under canvass. The depth of water on the bar ranges from eight feet at the lowest neap tide to sixteen at the highest spring tide. If a pier and water were constructed, it is supposed that the depth of water would be increased about two feet. An act of parliament was obtained and received the royal assent in 1854, for the construction of docks, and it is expected that the works will commence immediately. When the docks are constructed, ships of large tonnage will have easy access to deep water, by passing into the sea under sail, or by safe towing, and vessels can leave the port by all the leading southerly winds. The trade of the port is principally carried on between ports in France, the Baltic and Russia, and there are frequently more French than English sailors to be seen on the quays. From its position in the centre of an almost boundless coalfield, Blyth carries on a great trade in the exportation of coal, as the following return of the number of ships, their tonnage, and the number of tons annually exported from 1847 to 1852 inclusive will sufficiently prove:-

1847.

1848.

1849.

1850.

1851.

1852.

No. of ships
1,417
Tonnage
155,176
Tons of coal
230,056

No. of ships
1,318
Tonnage
155,599
Tons of coal
232,257

No. of ships
1,471
Tonnage
172,492
Tons of coal
252,222

No. of ships
1.354
Tonnage
166,374
Tons of coal
246,751

No. of ships
1,247
Tonnage
144,784
Tons of coal
209,057

No. of ships
1,148
Tonnage
123,139
Tons of coal
177,458

Upwards of 1,200 vessels clear this port annually, and about fourteen keels, and four steam-boats, are constantly employed on the river.

The ship-building yards of Blyth are very commodious, possessing ample accommodation for the repair of ships, and there is a first-rate dry dock capable of receiving vessels of any size up to 800 tons register. There are also two patent slip-ways and a floating dock, the latter of which will admit vessels of 300 tons burden, without having to be removed from their moorings. Ship-building is extensively carried on, and the superior manner in which the work is excuted [sic] has caused a great increase in that branch of industry. The vessels constructed here, are remarkable for the substantial manner in which they are built, for the superiority of their finish, and for their fast sailing qualities. The following return shows the number and tonnage of the vessels built here in each year from 1847 to 1853 inclusive :—

1847.

1848.

1849.

1850.

1851.

1852.

1853.

Ships.
4
Tons
645

Ships.
4
Tons
821

Ships.
4
Tons
1,055

Ships.
4
Tons
769

Ships.
4
Tons
1,085

Ships.
3
Tons
1,201

Ships.
5
Tons
1,980

THE CHAPEL situated in Northumberland-street is a neat building, erected in 1751, by Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bart. for the use of the inhabitants. It is surrounded by a burial ground and has a Sunday school attached. Rev. Robert Greenwood, chaplain. THE ENGLISH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH is situated in Church-street; it is a commodious brick edifice, possessing accommodation for about 500 hearers. Rev. John Reid, minister. THE METHODIST NEW CONNEXION, or ZION CHAPEL, erected in 1818, is situated at Waterloo; it is an octagonal building, and has sittings for about 700 persons. Rev. Joseph Simon, minister. THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, Waterloo Place, was erected in 1825, at a cost of 600. It is a small handsome stone building seated for 450 persons. The Rev. Daniel Carmichael, the present minister, has officiated here for the last 26 years. THE WESLEYAN CHAPEL, Ballast Hills, erected in 1815, is a neat brick building, and is capable of accommodating upwards of 600 hearers. There is also a PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHAPEL at Cowpen Quay.

The Catholics of this town and neighbourhood go to Cowpen, where there is a very beautiful Catholic Church, erected and endowed by Marlow John Francis Sidney, Esq. The above-mentioned places of worship have Day and Sunday schools attached, which are well attended.

THE CUSTOM HOUSE is situated at the north bank of the river Blyth, and is under the control of the establishment at North Shields. It is superintended by Mr. James Irwin, sub-collector, and Mr. James Scott, sub-comptroller. The district of coast under the Custom House here extends from Lynn Burn in the north, to Brierdean Burn in the south, a distance of twelve miles. THE COAST GUARD OFFICE is situated at the Low Quay. J.T. Sullivan, R.N. commanding officer; and the HARBOUR MASTER'S OFFICE is on the High Quay, George Harrison, master. A circular stone lighthouse was erected here in the year 1788, by Sir M.W. Ridley; William Morrison is the present keeper. There is also a beacon light called the "Basket Rock Light," or more commonly "Jack in the Basket." During the French wars a detachment of soldiers from Tynemouth did duty at a small fort which had been erected here.

There is a mechanics institution in Northumberland-street, Mr. John Robert Forster, secretary - and a news room in the same street, which is well supplied with London and local papers. Mr. John Dent, secretary. The PILOT OFFICE is situated at the Ferry Boat Landing, Robert Oliver, master; and the SHIPWRECKED FISHERMEN AND MARINERS ROYAL BENEVOLENT SOCIETY has its offices in Northumberland-street, Mr. James Darling, honorary secretary. Here are also two Ship Insurance Clubs, the "Marine," and "Friendly," which are held at the Star and Garter Inn. Mr. William Marshall is the secretary of the former, and Mr. James Darling of the latter. Besides these there are building, friendly, and other societies. Petty Sessions are held at the Ridley Arms Inn once a month, and a kind of market for the sale of vegetables is held every Saturday.

A LIFE BOAT is stationed here and a second is in contemplation. A melancholy disaster attended the use of the life boat on the 3rd of April, 1810, when it was manned by sixteen persons, who went to the assistance of the Hartley and Cullercoats fishermen, who had been overtaken by a violent gale. Twelve fishermen were taken on board the boat, which immediately made for the shore at Hartley Bates, but on its approaching the land it was struck by a heavy sea and twenty-six poor fellows found a watery grave. A second accident, which is still fresh in the memories of the inhabitants, occurred on the 28th October, 1841. The Sibsons from Archangel, appeared off Blyth. Mr. Hodgson the owner of the vessel had charge of the life boat, and it being customary to try its capabilities when the sea ran high, advantage was taken of the opportunity which then offered. Mr. Hodgson and the crew embarked, but scarcely had they crossed the bar, when the boat was upset and its inmates thrown into the sea. The men clung to the bottom of the boat, from which they were successively washed away by the violence of the waves. Mr. Hodgson, being a cripple and unable to make much exertion, tied an oar to his wrist, and by that means was enabled to keep afloat until he was rescued. Another man, Henry Kinch, escaped by his superior swimming, the others were lost.

NEWSHAM is a lordship and joint township with Blyth, held formerly in capite of Henry III by the Deleval [sic] family, from whom it passed to the Cramlingtons, and Radcliffes, becoming ultimately the property of the Ridleys. It is situated one mile and three-quarters south by west of Blyth, to which it united about sixty years ago, having been previously a separate township. The Blyth and Tyne Railway Company have a station here.

LINK HOUSE is a hamlet in this lordship, one mile south of Blyth.

BIOGRAPHY. - Mr. William Carr, of this town, was, when in his prime, a prodigy of strength. He was born at Hartley Old Engine, on the 3rd of April, 1766, and at the early age of eleven years was apprenticed to his father who carried on business as a blacksmith, at that place. When he had attained his seventeenth year, he was upwards of six feet three inches in height, weighed 16 stones, and could raise from the ground seven or eight hundred weight with the greatest ease. At thirty he measured six feet four inches, and weighed 24 stones. We are told that, at this period, he carried an anchor weighing ten hundred weight, from the sands to his father's shop, for repairs. By his frequent and violent exertions of this nature, he became, at a period of life when most men are in their prime, quite enfeebled, and unable to sustain his immense body. For some time he was enabled to walk by the aid of sticks, but nature at length refused this kind of assistance, and he finally took to his bed, where he lay for several years. Distressed in mind, and weakened in body, he died at Blyth on the 6th of September, 1825, in the sixtieth year of his age.

BACKWORTH is a township and village, the property of the Duke of Northumberland. The township contains 1,360 acres, and its rateable value is 4,961 7s. 7d. The number of its inhabitants in 1801, was 163; in 1811, 157; in 1821, 243; in 1831, 412; in 1841, 413; and in 1851, 404 souls. There is a colliery in this township, worked by Humble, Lamb, & Co., which employs upwards of 300 persons. In ancient times Backworth was the property of the priors of Tynemouth, with whom it remained till the Dissolution, when it was granted to the Grey family, from whom it was purchased by the Duke of Northumberland, for the sum of 95,000. THE VILLAGE of Backworth is situated seven miles north-east of Newcastle. Here is a school towards the erection of which the Duke of Northumberland was a large contributor. BACKWORTH HOUSE, in this township, the temporary residence of the Rev. H. Bunbury, incumbent of Sighill Church, is pleasantly situated in the midst of a fine plantation. BACKWORTH ACADEMY is conducted by Mr. Thomas Ramsay.

BURRADON, OR BRIERDEAN township is situated six and a half miles N.N.E. of Newcastle, and comprises an area of 535 acres. Its rateable value is 600, and the tithes amount to about 115 per annum. The population in 1801 was 29; in 1811, 48; in 1821, 52; in 1831, 67; in 1841, 97; and in 1851, 87 souls. Here are excellent freestone quarries and a colliery, the former worked by Mr. Tate, and the latter by the proprietors of Sighill Colliery. This estate was formerly the property of the late W.W. Ogle, Esq. of Causey Park, but it is at present in chancery. Here is a fine old tower, which, in 1552, was the residence of a member of the Anderson family. It is a large square edifice, built upon a rocky eminence, commanding an extensive view of the surrounding country, and originally consisted of three storeys, with an entrance on the eastern side. An arched vault, of twenty-one feet by eighteen, constitutes the ground floor, from which a circular stone staircase heads to the upper apartments. The original covering of the building is gone, and the battlements, with the whole of the upper portion of the building, are in a state of great dilapidation. By means of a tile roof a part of this ancient pile has been rendered habitable, forming a portion of the adjoining farmstead, which is attached to two sides of the tower.

EARSDON is a township and village in the parish of the same name, the property of the Duke of Northumberland, Hugh Taylor, Esq. and others. The township embraces an area of 1,769 acres, and its rateable value is 2,379 10s. The number of inhabitants in 1801, was 206; in 1811, 215; [in 1821, 261; in 1831, 628; in 1841, 683: and in 1851, 551 souls. The manor of Earsdon was formerly the property of the priors of Tynemouth, as was also the parish tithes, with the exception of six shillings paid to the Abbey of St. Alban. The Duke of Northumberland is the present possessor of the manorial rights and privileges.

THE VILLAGE of Earsdon is pleasantly situated on a rocky eminence, two and a half miles W. from the sea, and four miles N.W. by N. from North Shields. THE CHURCH, dedicated to St. Alban, the proto-martyr of Britain, is a neat structure in the early English style of architecture, erected in 1836, at a cost of 2,200. It is situated at the east end of the site of the former church which was pulled down after the erection of the present structure. It contains 600 sittings, 200 of which are free, and being situated on an eminence, its tower can be discerned at a considerable distance by both sea and land. It was consecrated by the Lord Bishop of Durham on the 12th of October, 1837. The parish register commences in 1589. The living, a perpetual curacy in the archdeaconry of Northumberland, and deanery of Newcastle, is valued in the Liber Regis at 11; gross income, 119. Rev. Henry Warkman, incumbent. The patronage is vested in the proprietors of the various estates throughout the parish.

The Primitive Methodists have a chapel here.

HARTLEY is a township and village in this parish, comprising, along with Seaton Delaval, 4,219 acres. Population in 1801, 1,639; in 1811, 1,872; in 1821, 1,795; in 1831, 1,850; in 1841, 1,911; and in 1851, 1,627 souls. The manor of Hartley was held of the barony of Gaugy, by knight's service in the reign of King John, by Adam de Jesmont, and a mediety of it by Henry Delaval, in the reign of Richard II. The Delaval family afterwards acquired possession of the entire manor, and it is now the property of Lord Hastings. On Bate's Island, nearly opposite Hartley, there was formerly a chapel and hermitage dedicated to the Blessed Virgin. THE VILLAGE of Hartley is situated five miles and a half north of North Shields, and is principally inhabited by colliers, sailors, and fishermen. There is a Primitive Methodist Chapel here, and one belonging to the Wesleyans at Seaton Grove, a hamlet in this township, four and a half miles south of Blyth,

SEATON SLUICE, OR HARTLEY PANS, is a village in the above township, containing in 1851, a population of 802 souls. It is situated about half a mile north of Hartley village, and four miles south of Blyth. It was formerly the property of the priors of Tynemouth, and afterwards of the Delaval family, from whom it passed to Lord Hastings, and subsequently to the Marquis of Waterford. Here are extensive bottle-works, in which many persons are employed. A Reading Room was established in this village by the operatives of the place, in April, 1853. The proprietors of the bottle-works gave them a suitable building, rent free, and encouraged, by every means in their power, the workmen in their praiseworthy efforts at self-improvement. Mr. W. Marshall, secretary, and Mr. John Taylor, treasurer.

The harbour here is one of great curiosity, having been cut through a solid rock. Its entrance is nine hundred feet long, thirty feet broad, and fifty-two feet deep, and it is well worthy [of] the attention of the stranger. The haven was formed by Sir Ralph Delaval, and was originally a short distance to the north, of small extent, dry at low water, and difficult of access. The river also made its course due east, until it was within a little way of the sea, and then by a sudden turn discharged itself due north. At the point of this angle the haven was made, and in its construction Sir Ralph found plenty to exercise his skill and patience. The stone pier which protected it from the north-east wind, was several times carried away by the sea, and when this difficulty was overcome, a new inconvenience arose, by the port becoming filled with mud and sand, though a pretty sharp rill ran through it. In order that this mischief might be removed, he placed a strong sluice, with flood-gates upon the brook, and these being closed by the coming in of the tide, the back water collected into a body and forcing a passage at the ebb, carried all before it, which, twice in twenty-four hours, scoured the bed of the haven. The cut through the solid freestone rock above-mentioned, and forming the present entrance to the harbour, was effected by the late Lord Delaval, from the plans of Thomas Delaval, Esq. The word Sluice was added to the name of this place, from the sluice and flood-gates at the entrance of the port. The harbour here was in great danger of being destroyed by the dreadful hurricane which took place on the 2nd of February, 1825. The wind blew a heavy gale from the northward, and the sea was tremendously high, which, with the tide, threatened the entire demolition of the harbour. A breach was made by the sea through one of the piers, but, by very great exertions, it was repaired before the next tide. The whole of the east side of the stone pier was destroyed, and the entrance to the old harbour blocked up. The vessels in the port, did not, however, sustain any damage. The Seaton Burn rivulet which falls into the sea at Seaton Sluice, rises near the Six Mile Bridge, on the Newcastle and Morpeth road, and flows in an eastern direction to the sea at this place.

HOLYWELL is a township and village, the property of the Duke of Northumberland, and the executors of the late R. Bates, Esq. of Milburn Hall. The township comprises an area of 1,180 acres, and its rateable value is 3,701. The number of inhabitants in 1801, was 107; in 1811, 124; in 1821, 100; in 1831, 478; in 1841, 1,164; and in 1851, 1,134 souls. The rapid increase of the population observable in this township is attributed to the opening of collieries. The manor was formerly held in soccage of the Baliols by the Delavals who had property here in 1435. At present the manorial rights and privileges are possessed by the Duke of Northumberland. THE VILLAGE of Holywell is situated five and a half miles N.N.W. of North Shields, and derives its name from Our Lady's Well, which is in the immediate vicinity; the medicinal properties of the water of this well were formerly much esteemed. It possesses the singular property of becoming of a puce colour when galls are infused into it. The village consists of two inns, two shops, and several farm houses and cottages.

EAST HOLYWELL COLLIERY is, as its name implies, a colliery hamlet, consisting of four or five rows of cottages inhabited by the pitmen in the employment of Hugh Taylor, & Co., the owners of the colliery here, of which Mr. Robert Bell is cashier, and Mr. Robert Hann, under viewer.

WEST HOLYWELL COLLIERY is another hamlet in this township, and is inhabited by about 150 persons, who are employed in and about the colliery which gives name to the hamlet. This colliery is now worked by the executors of William Clarke, Thomas Taylor, John Buddle, and others, Here is a small Methodist Chapel, erected in 1829. The Blyth and Tyne Railway Company have a station here, George Horsley, station master.

SEATON TERRACE is also a hamlet in this township, situated on the Shields and Morpeth Turnpike Road, one mile north of Holywell. It consists of a row of neat and substantial stone cottages two stories high, and possesses two inns, besides two or three grocers' shops. It is chiefly inhabited by the working classes.

seaton delaval is a township and village in the above parish, the property of Lord Hastings. The area of the township is included with that of Hartley, and its rateable value is 6,084. 12s. The population in 1801, inclusive of the hamlet of Whitridge, was 240; in 1811, 322; in 1821, 240; in 1831, 271; in 1841, it had increased to 1,568; and in 1851, in consequence of the opening of a colliery it had attained to 2,726 souls. The ancient family of Delaval existed in this township from the time of the Norman Conquest, until the year 1818. This family was related to the Conqueror, by the marriage of Guy Delaval to Dionesia, neice [sic] of William. Sir Hendrick Delaval, second son of the above-mentioned Guy, was one of the principal standard bearers at Hastings. It appears that this family soon afterwards acquired extensive possessions in the north, for we find, that in 1121, Hubert Delaval, gave the tithes of Seaton, Callerton, and Dissington, to the priors of Tynemouth, and other members of the family were equally generous to the abbey of Hexham. According to Dugdale, some of this family held estates also in Yorkshire, and we discover the name of Gilbert Delaval among the twenty-four barons, sworn to see the Magna Charta, and the Charta de Foresta confirmed by the Pope. Eustace Delaval held Black Callerton, Seaton, Newsham, and Dissington in capite of Henry III for two knights' fees. Subsequently a great portion of the family estates was vested in William Delaval, of Benwell, but in 1450 one of the Whitchester family appears as the proprietor of a third part of the Manor of Seaton Delaval. Sir John Delaval married Elizabeth, daughter of William de Whitchester, by whom he had an only daughter and heiress, Elizabeth, who was espoused by John Horsley de Ulchester, who thereupon assumed the name and arms of Delaval, and his son James succeeded to the Delaval estate. One of his descendants, Robert Delaval, represented Northumberland in parliament during the reign of Charles II, and was created a baronet in 1660, but after three successions, the title became extinct by the failure of the male line, and the estate passed to George Delaval, of South Dissington. He was succeeded by his son Edward, who married Mary, the daughter of Sir Francis Blake, of Ford Castle, by whom he had one son, Francis Blake Delaval, Esq., who died in 1752, and was succeeded by his son Sir Francis Blake Delaval, one of the gayest and most accomplished men of the age in which he lived. Dying without legitimate issue, in 1771, he was succeeded by his brother Sir John Husssey [sic] Delaval, who was created a baronet in 1761, and raised to the peerage, as Baron Delaval, in 1783. His lordship died without male issue, in 1808, at the advanced age of eighty years, when his entailed estates were inherited by his brother, Edward Hussey Delaval, of Doddington. Edward Hussey Delaval was an excellent scholar, well versed in the classics, and conversant in most languages, both ancient and modern, but chemistry and experimental philosophy were his favourite pursuits. He was a member of several royal and learned societies, and many of his discoveries and observations were translated into the French and German languages, and received the approbation of scientific men both at home and abroad. He died without issue, in August, 1818, aged eighty-five years, and was interred in Westminster Abbey. On his demise the valuable estate of Seaton Delaval became the property of Sir Jacob Astley, Bart, of Melton Constable, Norfolk, who was raised to the peerage in 1841, by the style and title of Baron Hastings.

the village of Seaton Delaval is situated about six and half miles north by west of North Shields. It consists of eight rows of cottages connected with the Seaton Delaval Colliery, which is worked by Joseph Lamb and Co. These cottages have all been erected since the commencement of the mining operations in 1837. Here is a Presbyterian Church erected in 1845. It is a handsome building of freestone, and will accommodate about 580 persons. Rev. Robert Henderson, minister. There is a day school attached to this church, Alexander Anderson, teacher. The Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists have also neat chapels here, both of which were erected in 1845. The Catholics have a temporary place of worship in this neighbourhood, but it is in contemplation to erect a suitable church as soon as possible. Rev. John Bradley, O.S.B., priest

The noble mansion of seaton delaval hall was destroyed by fire on the 3rd of January, 1822; the two wings only were saved by destroying the corridor which united them to the main body of the edifice. Previous to its destruction it was considered to be one of the most elegant mansions in the north of England. It was built by Admiral Delaval, from a design by the celebrated architect Sir John Vanburgh. The north front consisted of five stories of excellent masonry, ornamented with six Doric columns, surmounted by richly embellished entablatures, above which were elegant vases placed on pedestals, whence the attic story rose, having a grand pediment with a triangular tympanum, in which were carved the arms of the family and various trophies. The apartments were all ornamented and finished in the most superb manner. The hall was paved with black and white marble, and the walls were decorated with arches, niches, recesses, and statues, the productions of the best Italian artists. Adjacent to this hall was a splendid saloon, which contained eight beautifully fluted Corinthian columns, besides numerous pilasters. This apartment opened into a beautiful Ionic portico. Indeed the whole pile appeared more like a royal palace than the country seat of a subject. The pleasure grounds are extensive, and great attention appears to have been bestowed upon them. Although so near the sea, the trees in the lawn are healthy, and have attained a considerable size, but in the sea-walk and where the plantations are narrow, they are stunted and poor. A fine obelisk, about half a mile south of the house, has been happily placed in the dead flat towards Tynemouth. These grounds are now used as a pleasure garden, and are much frequented by parties from Newcastle during the summer months. Mr. George Bell, lessee.

The old castle of Seaton Delaval occupied a site a little to the south-west of the modern mansion. Of this ancient structure the only vestige now remaining is the chapel, one of the purest and most perfect specimens of Norman architecture in the kingdom, the roof being the only part that has undergone any alteration. The western door is surmounted by six shields, charged with the arms of the Delavals. The arches at the entrance of the chancel are supported by "ponderous columns short and low," with plain heavy capitals, and wrought with double tiers of zig-zag ornaments. Here are two ancient tombs surmounted by recumbent figures of a crusader and his lady. The walls are decorated with pieces of old armour, tattered banners, and escutcheons. Service is performed here every Sunday afternoon, by the Rev. Henry Warkman. Adjacent to this chapel is a fine Mausoleum, erected by Lord Delaval in memory of his son, who died in his twentieth year. This monument is much admired for the simplicity and elegance displayed in its construction.

new hartley, a hamlet in this township, is situated about one mile east of Seaton Delaval. Here is a small chapel, erected in 1852, the property of the Methodist New Connexion.

whitRidge is another hamlet in this township, six and a half miles W.N.W. of North Shields, and two and a half miles west of Seaton Sluice.

sighill, seghill, or sedgehill, is a township and village in the parish of Earsdon, the property of Sir Francis Blake. The area of the township is 1,403 acres, and its rateable value 5,886. 10s. Population in 1801, 97; in 1811, 128; in 1821, 138; in 1831, 985; in 1841, 1,672; and in 1851, 1,869 souls. Sighill was created a district parish for ecclesiastical purposes in 1846, But for other purposes, not ecclesiastical, it still forms part of Earsdon parish. Sighill Colliery, in this township, is the property of Messrs. Carr and Co. It was opened in the year 1836, and gives employment to about 700 persons. The Sighill shaft is 600 feet deep, at the bottom of which there is an engine of 170 horse power, which draws the coal from the workings underground. The mine ramifies in almost every direction, some of the passages reaching as far as Burradon, where there is another shaft by which visitors to the mine may ascend. The distance under ground is three miles, and over ground two miles.

the village of Sighill is situated on the north side of the Seaton Burn, seven miles N.N.E. from Newcastle. the church is a handsome stone structure, in the Gothic style, erected in 1848, and capable of accommodating 530 persons. A grant of 220, in aid of its erection was made by the "Incorporated Society for promoting the enlargement and building of Churches," on condition that seats for 426 persons should be set apart, and declared free and unappropriated for ever. The interior arrangements of this edifice are very neat, and the softened light which streams through its beautifully stained eastern window, adds materially to the general impressiveness of the structure. The church is surrounded by a burial ground of two acres, inclusive of the site occupied by the sacred edifice. The living is a perpetual curacy, the patronage of which is vested in the Crown, and the Bishop of Durham, who present alternately. Rev. H. Bunbury, incumbent. The Wesleyan and Primitive Methodists have places of worship here. The Blyth and Tyne Railway Company have a station at the village.


 

William Whellan & Co., History of Northumberland, 1855


 

 
 

01 January 2012

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